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New Person, Same Old Mistakes

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How have you been, friend? If you notice I didn't start this year with a post dedicated to how we can make promises to ourselves or resolutions, because quite frankly, I don't believe in them.  Resolutions are huge goals we set to get energized about the approaching year, only for us to be lifted in adrenaline and fall short and feel miserable two weeks later. Did you know there is this phenomena called 'Blue Monday' which takes place every year on January 15th? Apparently it symbolizes the most depressing day of the year due to the overwhelming feeling of guilt due to failed resolutions. Let's cancel that. 

Today's session focuses on how to be a new person, while making the same old mistakes. Because let's face it- we didn't miraculously change into different beings as the clock struck 12 on 31 December. We are the same folks, who are still just trying to figure things out and navigate the minutia of everyday life. The same life no one gave us a manual for. So instead of mentally organizing this year in the term of resolutions, huge goals, and aspirations, let's just work on being better people and continuing the good habits we've acquired over the past year. Below you'll find out how to level up- but just enough that you won't get overwhelmed and actually make some progress.

POSITIVE DISTRACTION OF THE WEEK

2018 is one of those years we'd hear about in 2009 and it felt so far away, so distant, so futuristic, only for it to land on our laps in a blink of an eye. This week raise your standards and expand your identity.  Effectively plan real changes and examine your behavior to make small tweaks toward lasting progress. How do we do this? Become mindful of your time, space, and understand that moments matter. 

1. Expand upon healthy habits you've built last year; simply put- keep doing what works, identify and ditch what doesn't. Shift your thinking this year to focus on what you want to manifest, not what you don't want. 

2. Start the year with an anchored habit; I've spoken about this before & I'll bring it up again. Pick a habit that leads to other changes in various aspects of your life, subsequently altering all of them. Think: the domino effect. `

For example: My keystone habit is learning a new skill. I try to take a few minutes to learn something new about something that interests me. What ends up happening is that I simultaneously activate a productivity source that connects the new skill to something else I have in place. This then energizes me to work on goals that I've set out.  Here's how to identify yours and ideas if you're a little stuck.

3. Re-evaluate to rewire your brain; Constant check-ins with yourself is beneficial to making sure you're keeping your word. Resolutions fall short because there is too much space and time in-between check-ins and it just gets too overwhelming. Check your time management schedule strategies and get yourself together. 

4. Find your tribe; Followup weekly with me + find people who are also in your lane. That quote of misery loving company is real; if you're going at it alone, the voice of isolation can be extremely loud and damning.

5. Get intentional. Give yourself the wiggle room to fail is not setting yourself up for failure. This year is not about inventing a new identity- take the steps to become a better version of yourself and the person you know you want to become.

Remember:

“You can affect change by transforming the only thing that you ever had control over in the first place and that is yourself.” -Deepak Chopra

Feel free to share the love via the links below to someone who could also use a few ideas on how to be a new person while making the same old mistakes. Thanks so much for following up this week. I'm already looking forward to session with you next Sunday. You can like this post below via heart-moji and be sure to share this with a friend. Follow-up in one week! ALSO, be sure to check out my giveaway! Provide feedback for a chance to win a self-care package!!

Best, Dr. Dyce

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